5 Tips for Writing the Best Real Estate Blogs

Writing a real estate blog is a great way for real estate professionals to both build their brand and engage with local audiences. With blogging becoming increasingly accessible due to online platforms like WordPress, Wix and Tumblr, anyone has the ability to build one online. That being said, writing high-quality posts for real estate blogs that are both informative and valuable is easier said than done.

Not sure how to get started? We’ve taken the liberty of gathering five tips to help you get started writing the best real estate blog possible.

Research keywords applicable to your niche and location

If you’re putting hard work into real estate blog posts, you want people to actually read them. Google indexes pages based on their authority, which is determined by a number of factors such as how many other pages are linking to you and how many keywords relevant to the search term appear in the text of your blog. Below is an example of how to find the best keywords to your niche and location for free, and how to properly integrate them for optimal results.

Write a blog post optimized for SEO

Before we dive into this tip, you might be wondering what “SEO” stands for. Short for “Search Engine Optimization,” SEO is basically a measurement system for the relevancy of different articles online. The internet is pretty saturated with real estate articles, so optimizing your post with SEO in mind can make yours rise to the top of the Google search results.

Keep the tone casual

People generally like posts that feel like friendly advice rather than reading a manual, so keep that in mind when finding your writing tone. It’s ok to include a little bit of humor in your writing, and your audience will likely appreciate a blog with a warm touch.

The most important thing to remember is that you want to keep people on your page and engaged with your content. Write in a way that your audience will understand. Make them want to keep coming back because you’re so clear and helpful.

Share your blog post through your newsletter and social

Once you have your blog post written, a great way to maximize the impact is to share it across your other platforms for communication online. This includes a weekly e-newsletter and social media channels. Starting a blog and building a community online is important, and connecting the different platforms only strengthens that community.

Use visuals when sharing your blog posts

When sharing that you’ve posted a new blog on social media, it’s typically a good idea to avoid text-heavy posts. For example, let’s say that you have a real estate investing blog. Post a visually appealing picture of the post’s subject and link to the full article. Try to avoid social posts that involve taking a screenshot of your real estate articles, as text doesn’t usually transfer well onto platforms like Instagram.

Real estate blog ideas

There is no right or wrong way to start a real estate blog, but the more specific you are with your intended audience, the better. Are you writing real estate articles for other real estate professionals? Are you creating a real estate investing blog for potential clients? Whether your blog will focus on local tips for your surrounding real estate market or offer insight into the specifics of staging a house, targeting the right audience to position your blog is key.

What’s the Difference Real Estate Agent, Broker, Realtor?

Whether you want to buy or sell a home, you’ll want some help. So who should you hire? Real estate professionals go by various names, including real estate agent, real estate broker, or Realtor®. So what’s the difference?

Sometimes consumers use these titles interchangeably, but rest assured, there are some important differences, as well as varying requirements for using particular titles.

Here’s a rundown of the real estate professional titles you’ll come across, and what they mean.

Real estate agent

A real estate agent is someone who has a professional license to help people buy, sell, or rent all sorts of housing and real estate.

To get that license, states require that individuals take pre-licensing training. The required number of training hours can vary significantly by jurisdiction. In Virginia, for example, real estate agents must take 60 hours of pre-licensing training, but in California they need to take 135 hours.

Once that training is done, aspiring agents take a written licensing exam. These exams are typically divided into two portions: one on federal real estate laws and general real estate principles, the second on state-specific laws.

Once they pass their exams, they’ve earned the title of a “real estate agent” and can begin working with home buyers, sellers, and renters.

Real estate broker

A real estate broker is someone who has taken education beyond the agent level as required by state laws and passed a broker’s license exam.

Similar to real estate agent exams, each state sets its own broker education and exam requirements. The extra coursework covers topics such as ethics, contracts, taxes, and insurance—at a more in-depth level than what’s taught in a real estate agent pre-licensing course.

Prospective brokers also learn about real estate legal issues and how the law applies to operating a brokerage, real estate investments, construction, and property management.

As a result, “brokers have in-depth knowledge of the real estate business,” says Jennifer Baxter, associate broker at Re/Max Regency in Suwanee, GA.

To sit for the broker’s exam and obtain license, real estate agents must already have a certain level of experience under their belt—typically, three years as a licensed real estate agent.

There are three types of real estate brokers, each with subtle differences in the role they perform:

  • Principal/designated broker: Each real estate office has a principal/designated broker. This person oversees all licensed real estate agents at the firm and ensures that agents are operating in compliance with state and national real estate law. Like real estate agents, principal brokers get paid on commission—taking a cut of the commissions of the sales agents they supervise (although many principal brokers receive an annual base salary).
  • Managing broker: This person oversees the day-to-day operation of the office and typically takes a hands-on approach to hiring agents, training new agents, and managing administrative staff. (Some principal/designated brokers also serve as managing brokers.)
  • Associate broker: This real estate professional—sometimes called a broker associate, broker-salesperson, or affiliate broker—has a broker’s license but is working under a managing broker. This person typically is not responsible for supervising other agents.

Realtor

In order to become a Realtor—a licensed agent with the ability to use that widely respected title—an agent needs to be a member of the National Association of Realtors®.

Listing agent

A listing agent is a real estate agent who represents a home seller. Listing agents help home sellers with a wide range of tasks, including pricing their home, recommending home improvements or staging, marketing their home, holding open houses, coordinating showings with home buyers, negotiating with buyers, and overseeing the home inspection process and closing procedures.

Generally, listing agents don’t receive a dime unless your home gets sold. If it does, the typical agent commission is 5% to 6% of the price of your home (which is typically split between the listing agent and the buyer’s agent), but a listing agent’s fee can vary depending on the scope of their services and their housing market.

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Buyer’s agent

True to their name, buyer’s agents represent home buyers and assist them through every step of the home-buying process, including finding the right home, negotiating an offer, recommending other professionals (e.g., mortgage brokers, real estate attorneys, settlement companies), and troubleshooting problems (e.g., home inspection or appraisal issues).

Fortunately for home buyers, they don’t need to worry about the expense of hiring a buyer’s agent. Why? Because the seller usually pays the commission for both the seller’s agent and the buyer’s agent from the listing agent’s fee.